Last edited by Gozshura
Wednesday, February 12, 2020 | History

4 edition of The golden ass. found in the catalog.

The golden ass.

Apuleius

The golden ass.

  • 15 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading

Published by Collier Books in New York .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 11.

StatementTranslated by William Adlington [1566] Edited, with an introd. by Harry C. Schnur.
SeriesCollier classics of Greece and Rome,, HS14
ContributionsAdlington, William, fl. 1566, tr., Schnur, Harry C. ed.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPA6209.M3 A4 1962
The Physical Object
Pagination286 p.
Number of Pages286
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5857755M
LC Control Number62019971
OCLC/WorldCa1664784

He knows he can revert to his own body by eating rose-petals, but these prove singularly elusive; and the bulk of the work describes his adventures as an animal. Search by: Title, Author or Keyword Metamorphosis or The Golden Ass By: Lucius Apuleius The Metamorphosis, also known as The Golden Ass, is one of the very few novels of the Ancient World that survived to our days; one of the two novels of Roman Literature that we can still read; and the only one preserved in its entirety the other one being the extremely fragmentary Satyricon. He flourished in Carthage in the time of Iolianus Avitus and Cl. Whereupon shee, mooved by their promises, and stirred by pitty, released all the towne. Apuleius is quite a writer, and the old fashioned language rather serves to accentuate the power of the language rather than serve as a detriment to it. The author's baroque Latin style nicely matches his fantastic narrative and is guaranteed to hold a reader's attention from beginning to end.

He is going to Thessaly to do business when he comes across two men on the road. Table of Contents. She points to Aristomenes, his counselor, and says how sorry he will be. To whom shall I seeme to tell any similitude of truth, when as I shall tell the trueth in deed? Aristomenes admits he is a bit afraid. In attempted atonement, Psyche seeks the temple of Venus and offers herself as a slave.

Once there, the ass is entrusted to a horrid boy who torments him but the boy is later killed by a she-bear. Lucius is interested, and offers the teller a free lunch for his tale. And behold there entred in two old women, the one bearing a burning torch, and the other a sponge and a naked sword; and so in this habit they stood about Socrates being fast asleep. Howbeit as halfe ashamed I drew towards her, and shee turned her selfe and sayd, Behold how he resembleth the very same grace as his mother Salvia doth, behold his countenance and stature, agreeing thereto in each poynt, behold his comely state, his fine slendernesse, his Vermilion colour, his haire yellow by nature, his gray and quicke eye, like to the Eagle, and his trim and comely gate, which do sufficiently prove him to be the naturall childe of Salvia. The author's baroque Latin style nicely matches his fantastic narrative and is guaranteed to hold a reader's attention from beginning to end. The bargain struck with the goddess, however, requires Lucius to give up his former life of constant gratification.


Share this book
You might also like
State opportunities for action

State opportunities for action

Under hatches

Under hatches

Saving your qualified plan

Saving your qualified plan

Words fitly spoken

Words fitly spoken

The state of food and nutrition in Montana

The state of food and nutrition in Montana

Johann Sebastian Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach

Irreverent guide to Paris

Irreverent guide to Paris

Holy, Holy, Holy

Holy, Holy, Holy

Arctic Adventure

Arctic Adventure

Salmon and steelhead stocks

Salmon and steelhead stocks

President-elect Herbert Hoovers good will cruise to Central and South America

President-elect Herbert Hoovers good will cruise to Central and South America

The golden ass. book

Then said I, behold here thy breakefast, and therewithall I opened my script that hanged upon my shoulder, and gave him bread and cheese, and we sate downe under a greate Plane tree, and I eat part with him; and while I beheld him eating greedily, I perceived that he waxed meigre and pale, and that his lively colour faded away, insomuch that beeing in great fear, and remembring those terrible furies of whom I lately dreamed, the first morsell of bread that I put in my mouth that was but very small did so stick in my jawes, that I could neither swallow it downe, nor yet yeeld it up, and moreover the small time of our being together increased my feare, and what is hee that seeing his companion die in the high-way before his face, would not greatly lament and bee sorry?

Behinde the back of the goddesse was carved a stone in manner of a Caverne, environed with mosse, herbes, leaves, sprigs, green branches and bowes, growing in and about the same, insomuch that within the stone it glistered and shone marvellously, under the brim of the stone hanged apples and grapes carved finely, wherein Art envying Nature, shewed her great cunning.

Neither is it any marvell, for although this light is but a small light, and made by the hands of men, yet hath it a remembrance of that great and heavenly light, as of his parent, and doth shew unto us what will happen in the Skies above. Then sayd I unto Socrates, Leave off this high and mysticall kinde of talke, and tell the matter in a more plaine and simple fashion.

The Dialogue of Trismegistus, translated by him out of Greeke into Latine, so fine, that it rather seemeth with more eloquence turned into Latine, than it was before written in Greeke.

Your IP Address in Germany is Blocked from www.gutenberg.org

The two go to sleep, but Aristomenes wakes when the doors burst open. Suddenly a band of robbers burst in and disrupt the household, using him and the other animals to load up their loot.

He also fails to think deeply about the message of the tale of Acteon and Diana, in which the former is turned into a stag and killed by his own hunting dogs after he inappropriately looks on the form of the goddess.

Howbeit as halfe ashamed I drew towards her, and shee turned her selfe and sayd, Behold how he resembleth the very same grace as his The golden ass. book Salvia doth, behold his countenance and stature, agreeing thereto in each poynt, behold his comely state, his fine slendernesse, his Vermilion colour, his haire yellow by nature, his gray and quicke eye, like to the Eagle, and his trim and comely gate, which do sufficiently prove him to be the naturall childe of Salvia.

He agrees. He is initiated into the mysteries of Isis and Osiris and lives happily as a lawyer for the rest of his life. Lucius, who is drunk, and his slave leave the party. The Preface of the Author To His Sonne, Faustinus And unto the Readers of this Book THAT I to thee some joyous jests may show in gentle gloze, And frankly feed thy bended eares with passing pleasant prose: So that thou daine in seemly sort this wanton booke to view, That is set out and garnisht fine, with written phrases new.

He basically acts like an ass, and so is transformed into one. Book 2 Lucius wakes up and remembers he is in Thessaly, the capital of magic arts. Then I demaunded, Whether she knew one Milo an Alderman of the city: Whereat she laughed and said: Verily it is not without cause that Milo is called an Elderman, and accounted as chiefe of those which dwel without the walls of the City.

Meroe tells her sister Panthia to behold Socrates, her troublesome lover. The child is indeed a daughter, and in pity, the mother convinces her poor neighbours to raise her. The narrative is interrupted by The Tale of the Wife's Tub.

He begins the story as a thoughtless, womanizing glutton.book 1 book 2 book 3 book 4 book 5 book 6 book 7 book 8 book 9 book 10 book chapter: The Golden Ass, being the Metamorphoses of Lucius Apuleius. Stephen Gaselee. London: William Heinemann; New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons. Keyboarding. The Mellon Foundation provided support for entering this text.

The Golden Ass by Apuleius is a unique, entertaining, and thoroughly readable Latin novel - the only work of fiction in Latin to have survived in entirety from antiquity.

It tells the story of the hero Lucius, whose curiosity and fascination for sex and magic results in his transformation into an ass. After suffering a series of trials and humiliations, he is ultimately transformed back into.

THE GOLDEN ASSE

The Golden Ass: The Transformations of Lucius by Apuleius and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at atlasbowling.com May 13,  · Book 2 of The Golden Ass finishes with a story given by the disfigured Thelyphron at Byrrhena’s dinner party.

Thelyphron tells of the evil women who steal body parts to conduct spells. Thus, every corpse must be carefully guarded in the night.

The Golden Ass by Apuleius is a unique, entertaining, and thoroughly readable Latin novel - the only work of fiction in Latin to have survived in entirety from antiquity.

It tells the story of the More. Apuleius’ enchanting story has inspired generations of writers such as Boccaccio, Shakespeare, Cervantes and Keats with its dazzling combination of allegory, satire, bawdiness and sheer exuberance, and The Golden Ass remains the most continuously and accessibly amusing book to have survived from Classical antiquity.